The Self-Sufficient Homestead
September 01, 2014, 03:55:49 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: The Straw-Bosses will be adding & reorganizing the message boards, so be patient. Johnny MAX
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Where does yeast come from June ?  (Read 3142 times)
Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« on: November 09, 2011, 08:08:50 PM »

June, since you have filled us in on how to make pecten for home made jellies and jams, it dawned on me while listening to the Pectin show...... If pecten does not have to come from a box from the store, what about the yeast for my home made bread ?  How do I make yeast for non sour dough breads ??   Undecided Does it come from the Yeaster Bunny ??  Cry
Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
fritz_monroe
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 511


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2011, 08:22:03 PM »

You can't make it, you have to catch the wild yeast.

I know that there is a lot of trial and error involved.

One thing you can do is save a small chunk of dough from your last batch of bread and make up a starter like you would for sourdough.
Logged

F_M
Check out my blogs at The Homestead Fritz and Camping with Fritz
Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2011, 05:16:29 AM »

Thats what I am trying to figure out.  If you have nothing to start with, no starter dough, then how do you make something to start using from then on ? Articles I have found on baking powder are for non rising breads like corn breads and biscuits.  I also want to know how to store it at least short term ( month ?? ) for later use.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2011, 06:24:41 AM by Hanzel » Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2011, 07:51:22 AM »

I think I found it.  Most of my searches kept coming back with Yeast Breads or how to make a starter with store bought yeast. Even the article for Amish Friendship bread had store yeast. I changed the way I was asking the question and found two interesting articles.

Sourdough Starter - Wheat
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Sourdough-Starter---Wheat/Detail.aspx   Uses honey

and one for Grape Yeast
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Wild-Grape-Starter/Detail.aspx  uses wild grapes

The Wheat starter ..

Quote
Ingredients

    1/2 teaspoon honey
    1/2 cup whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup non-chlorinated water (such as bottled)
     
    1/2 cup whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup non-chlorinated water (such as bottled)

Directions

1  In a glass or ceramic bowl, mix together the honey, 1/2 cup whole wheat flour, and 1/2 cup of water. Use a wooden spoon to stir. Cover lightly, and place in a warm place. Stir twice a day for 5 days.

2  On the 6th day, mix in 1/2 cup of water and 1/2 cup of flour using a wooden spoon. Don't worry about lumps, for the yeast will eat them! Cover and let stand in a warm place to ferment for 1 day. When you get lots of bubbles and foam on top, you know the starter is active and ready to use. The starter will separate with the flour on the bottom and 'hootch,' a yellow liquid, on top. Just mix well before using or feeding.

3  Store starter in a wide mouth glass jar. I use waxed paper and a rubber band in place of a lid, as metal utensils or containers will contaminate the starter. Once refrigerated, the starter only needs to be fed once a week. Use half, and feed the remaining half to keep it alive for the next time.


For the Grape

Quote
    1 pound grapes
    1 cup whole wheat flour

Directions

1  Stem grapes into a medium mixing bowl. Crush with hands. Cover with cheesecloth, and set aside for three days at room temperature.
2  After three days there should be bubbles in the grape juice, indicating fermentation has begun. Strain liquid, and discard skins. Return to bowl, and stir in 1 cup whole wheat flour. Set aside for 24 hours at room temperature.
3  Measure 1 cup starter, discard any extra, and transfer to a 1 quart glass or ceramic container with a lid. Stir in 1 scant cup bread flour and 1 cup water. The mixture should resemble a thick batter; add more water or flour if necessary to achieve this consistency. Cover loosely with lid. Let stand at room temperature for 24 hours. Repeat the following day. Some activity should be noticeable: the mixture should be starting to bubble. Repeat twice more. You will need to discard some of the mixture each day.
4  Starter should be quite active. Begin feeding regularly, every 4 to 6 hours, doubling the starter each time. For instance, if you have 1 cup starter, add 1 cup bread flour and 1 cup water. Alternatively, store in the refrigerator, and feed weekly.


Now these recipes are for non storeable yeast.  Can these starters somehow be made into dehydrated "crackers" or "wafers" and then used at a later date ?

Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
June
Plantation Owner
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2011, 10:44:09 AM »

" Can these starters somehow be made into dehydrated "crackers" or "wafers" and then used at a later date ?"
I have tried dehydrating and freezing.  Both methods were unsatisfactory for me so I gave it up.  The yeast loses potency and then dies.

First:  Fritz is correct.  You can't make yeast.

Yeast comes in three basic forms.  Baker's yeast. Active dry yeast.  Sour dough yeast.

Baker's yeast comes in a block.  It has a very short shelf life.  Commercial bakers use enough of it to be worth their while.  If you buy it you will throw a lot of it away because it will die before you can possibly use it.  Manufacturers of baker's yeast grow it in lab conditions.  They feed it special stuff that is not available to the average bear.  Then is washed and passed through micro filters.  You can't do this.  Forget it.  The best source for baker's yeast, if you really want to try it, is to go to your friendly neighbourhood baker and ask him/her for a chunk.  Tell him/her that his/her bread is great or his/her buns are terrific (depending on his/her and your gender.)  This has worked for me at some places like Tesco and Trader Bobs or whatever his name is.  Kroger and Walmart tend to just grunt and walk away.
Have to go now.
Grand daughter in law and I are murdering chickens.
I am supposed to be changing great grand daughter's diaper.  Must do it before my dog buries her.
June.

Logged

"The belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it seems to me to be the root of all the evil that is in the world."
Johnny Max
Big Straw-Boss
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4604



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2011, 09:45:36 PM »

You know the white dusty film on grapes? That is natural yeast that is attracted to the grape.
That is why you can just crush grapes, extract the juice and it will turn into wine. You can use the same yeast for dough.
Logged

Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2011, 03:17:44 AM »

My grapes are still in the "stick in the ground" phase
Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
June
Plantation Owner
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2011, 08:00:50 AM »

The second form of yeast, and the one I keep on hand for regular bread making, is active dry yeast.  There are several brands but the one you are likely to see is Fleischmann's.  This yeast has been rendered inactive due to lack of moisture and it has a much longer shelf life than baker's yeast.  When you buy it, (or any thing else with an expiration date)  always check the back of the shelves.  Supermarkets restock from the back and the freshest product is usually buried in the back.  Active dry yeast will usually be good for about 6 or 8 months  after the sell by date. Maybe a year if it is stored in really cool and dry conditions. Not the fridge. Too damp. Proof it in a little warm water and flour to see if it is still good.  Bread made with older yeast may take a little longer to rise, but it will still be good.
June.
Logged

"The belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it seems to me to be the root of all the evil that is in the world."
June
Plantation Owner
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2011, 08:32:15 AM »

The only form of yeast available prior to 1876 (check that date if you are into accuracy) when commercial yeast was introduced was a sour dough culture.  The ancient Egyptians used it.
Every region has its own wild yeast and people who are really into sour dough swear that they can tell the difference in taste between the different strains.  The San Francisco area is supposed to have the best wild yeast.
I began with a start that was given to me by a friend and I used that until another friend visited relatives in San Francisco and bought me back a start of the "best wild yeast in the world."  I couldn't tell the difference.  I am still using it, but by now it is probably so contaminated by local yeast that it probably isn't the "best" anymore.
Phone's ringing.
Be back in a few.
June.
Logged

"The belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it seems to me to be the root of all the evil that is in the world."
Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2011, 08:57:24 AM »

The only form of yeast available prior to 1876 (check that date if you are into accuracy) when commercial yeast was introduced was a sour dough culture. 


Made me go look it up

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Louis_Fleischmann
http://beer.wikia.com/wiki/Yeast

Quote
In the United States, naturally occurring airborne yeasts were used almost exclusively until commercial yeast was marketed at the Centennial Exposition in 1876 in Philadelphia, where Charles L. Fleischmann exhibited the product and a process to use it, as well as serving the resultant baked bread.
Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
June
Plantation Owner
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2011, 12:42:10 PM »

I knew there was a reason for that date to be stuck in my mind.   Centennial Exposition.  1776+100=1876.  All that math finally paid off.
O.K., we are ready to start some sour dough.  You will need a growing medium.  This is just flour and water and a little sugar.  Use bottled or filtered or well water.   Too much chlorine in city stuff.  If you must use city water let it sit overnight so that most of the chlorine has dispersed.  Use enough flour to make a creamy mixture and then add about a tblsp of sugar.  You can let this sit near an open window and hope you catch some yeast, or you can go JM's route and let a handful or two of grapes soak for a while in the water you are using.  Don't squash them.  I think it's easier to just add a half packet or so of dried yeast.  Cover and let it work for two or three days, depending on the temperature.  It will bubble and get foamy.  Then you just have to divide it every two or three days, use half for baking and feed the other half. Feed it with a similar flour, water and sugar mixture that you started with.  Not as much trouble as adopting a puppy, but this is a living organism and it does need regular care.
I have a glass jar with an air lock in the lid.  This lets the gases out without letting bacteria in.  Not necessary but don't seal it too well as those gases have to escape.  Yeast does not need oxygen.  Bacteria will sometimes work on the flour and sugar.  The yeast will still work, but it may taste strange.
Take a sniff at your sour dough on a regular basis.  It should smell pleasantly sour.  If it smells really vinegary or if it is so sour that it makes you pull back your head, or if it makes your eyes water, dump it and start again.
If you are going away for a week or so, put your sour dough in the fridge.  It will take a nap.  Longer than that and you will need a baby-sitter, or dump it and start again when you get back.
Don't get hung up on only white sour dough bread.  My favorite is sour dough rye.
Remember that there are soda biscuits and scones and tortillas and other breads that do not use yeast.
Have fun.
June.
Logged

"The belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it seems to me to be the root of all the evil that is in the world."
Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2011, 12:57:46 PM »

 Grin Thank you
Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
June
Plantation Owner
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2011, 06:14:25 PM »

You're welcome and in response to your question in the O.P.  No!  The Yeaster Bunny does not bring yeast.
But.........
Little known fact.
If you place your birthday cards under your pillow, the Youth Fairy will visit and remove a few wrinkles.
Neat, Huh?
June.
Logged

"The belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it seems to me to be the root of all the evil that is in the world."
Hanzel
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 957



View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2011, 06:39:06 PM »

will my hair grow back too ?  Undecided
Logged

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

https://www.facebook.com/PrepperLiving

Land, water, and septic.  Freedom is not Free, its priceless.
June
Plantation Owner
Plantation Owner
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 629


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2011, 10:55:02 PM »

Yes, it will grow back, but in all the wrong places.  Your ears, nostrils etc. etc.
June.
Logged

"The belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it seems to me to be the root of all the evil that is in the world."
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!